‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame’ at 25: ‘The Most R-Rated G You Will Ever See’

‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame’ is a Disney animated film from 25 years ago. Disney’s “Hunchback of Notre Dame” has been rated PG-13 by the MPAA. Due to the number of the films, the studio may have pushed for the rating. The film deals with the desire and fire of Gypsies and the menace of genocide in the 1800s.

But the fact that the darkest animated film by Disney is said to earn a rating equal to “Cinderella” shows the subjectivity of the rating system – and how much the tastes of parents have changed over the years.

MURPHY IS WANTED to adapt the 1831 story of the pretty girl of Roma Esmeralda, a character that got the attention of Parisian men, like Quasimodo, describing him as a “horrible” and a “man’s demon.” However, he soon realized his folly. “I was thinking, ‘Oh, God, I do not want to write a song, dance, watered-down movie, which makes this amazing literary work a Disney film,'” he explained.

However, he credited the then-executives of the Walt Disney Company for taking a hands-off approach. Of course, the Hugo novel, which concludes with the deaths of numerous major characters, was deemed “too depressing” for a Disney film. As a result, Murphy was forced to be inventive.

He decided to center the story on the vibrant fantasy world Quasimodo created while imprisoned in his bell tower. A festival will take place. Gargoyles that communicate. A hero worthy of admiration.

Hugo’s archdeacon becomes an evil magistrate in the new film. Instead of being whipped in the pillory, Quasimodo is pelted with vegetables and humiliated. Disney did not want to take on the church, producer Trousdale said.

Alan Menken, Stephen Schwartz and Stephen Trousdale and Wise wrote a new song for the Disney film “Frozen”. The song was inspired by a cassette tape that arrived at the Walt Disney Studios with a cassette of the original song. The entire cast took part in it.

Kirk Murphy’s new film, “Frenzy,” is about a priest’s love affair with a Roma woman. In the film, he agonizes over his lust and his religious faith and his hatred of the Roma. He says it was inspired by a cassette tape he made of actor Kirk Schneckartz singing.

According to Wise, the studio felt that anything above a G would jeopardize the film’s box office.A G-rated film “does not contain anything that would offend parents, in the theme, nudity, language, violence, sex, or other matters,” he says. In 1968, the rating system was introduced.

“Hunchback” producer: “We never thought we’d get away with the term ‘hellfire'”. The first cut of the song didn’t pass muster for a G, but it wasn’t the words “hell” or “damnation” that the board took issue with.

“Hunchback” director “There was definitely a huge effort to emphasize the lighthearted aspects” of the film. Hahn “I’m sure I wouldn’t do that today — I believe there’s a truth-in-advertising obligation.”

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